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Proletarians of the world, unite!

I'm starting a new category, to talk about things from my past. I used to travel quite a lot, and although earlier on I was 'too cool' to take photos (because that's what 'tourists' do), I do have some. So I'll try to have a picture and few comments about it.

This is my first one: taken in either Berlin or Warsaw in August 1991. I was with S; we had hitched from Brussels to Berlin, and took the train to Warsaw. The Soviet Union still existed then, though it was in its last throes, and the sleeper wagons that came from the USSR had the coat of arms of the United Socialist Soviet Republics embossed on the side.
USSR coat of arms on a train 1991

During the Cold War, there was a constant diet of warnings of how the Communists/the Russians/the Soviets wanted to take over the world. I was always suspicious of this propaganda, but later learned more about how deeply the Soviet Communist Party managed to infiltrate many organisations in the West.

This symbol, with the hammer and sickle stamped on the globe, was a powerful symbol of the internationalism of the Soviet/Communist ambitions and it was a bit creepy in a caricatural way.
USSR coat of arms on a train 1991

The writing around the edges translates as "Proletarians of the world, unite!" and it's written in all the languages of the USSR I suppose (clearer picture here). It's a slogan from The Communist Manifesto by Marx & Engels.

Band with interesting Erhu sound

I went to a wedding with WW on Sunday, at the Shangri-La in downtown KL. I don't like the decoration of that place very much, but the food was nice.

Chinese weddings can tend to all have the same food and lots of it tends to get wasted, which is always a pity to see. The portions were smaller there, and little was wasted; in addition they had individual servings like this one of rice steamed in lotus leaf

They also had herbal chicken which was very nice (also individually wrapped), a delicate cod with some kind of fruit sauce thing, and apple pie with coconut ice cream for desert.

The thing I really want to mention though, was the band


I'm not sure what they are called, but the card says 'Jason Geh Entertainment', and you can check them out here. They had a nice blend of jazzy, bluesy and for the dancing did some rock n roll, Dancing Queen and various crowd pleasers.

What I liked most of all was the erhu


The erhu is a traditional Chinese instrument, usually heard in kung-fu movies and the like, but here it made a really nice additional touch to the modern music. Very contemporary - hybrid, globalised, etc.

So thanks to Sasha and Phil for inviting us - and many congratulations again! Love always :-)

Twestivalkl - first tweetup!

On Sunday 19 September, I went to the #twestivalkl tweetup at the Mist club in Bangsar. It was my first one and so I went along to check it out. At the back of my mind I was wondering how it might be different from a blog meet, but I was also thinking that I should try to give fieldwork a break for once, and just enjoy. Which may be why I ended up drinking too much beer and regretting it for two days afterwards... :-|

They had stalls by 1901
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur 1901 stall

and New Zealand ice-cream
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur New Zealand ice cream stall

they were 'free flow', as was the Tiger beer (hence the morning after...)

I met a bunch of ex-students which was nice: reubenhot, cheeChingy, another guy whose name I forgot (I think it was Bryan? argh, sorry... beer...), and last but not least, DJ Prem :-)
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur DJ Prem

It always reminds me of my age to meet students who are now working in real jobs and so on, but it's also nice to see them outside of class. Honestly, teaching is a great job sometimes, and it's such an honour to have an opportunity to make a small difference in the life of so many people - sounds corny, but it's true. For a great rant on this topic - check out "What teachers make", by Taylor Mali.

Anyway, back to the twestivalkl.
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur

It was a charity event too - in to help Destiny Starting Point (video here). It's there to help boys who have dropped out and got involved in various delinquency problems - helping them to get back into schooling and get back on track.

Here is the Pastor who founded the place handing over a donated Lenovo computer to the fortunate Lucky Draw winner (looks happy, doesn't he!)
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur lenovo winner

and here he is again with @nikicheong, one of the organisers of the event,
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur niki cheong Pastor Stephen

the others being @davidlian, @suanie, @eevon, @radianceleong, @nigelais, and @Ling_Chan

Other prizes were a Poken, won by @kellster (who always seems to be winning things!)
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur kellster poken

And here are various Poekeners - with @aprilyim invading from the left :-P
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur poken

There were also some of the usual suspects: @dustyhawk, kruel74, @joshlim, and the intrepid photographer - @benjicajess
twestivalkl tweetup kuala lumpur benjicajess

and others who I can't remember...

So. Were there significant differences with a blog meet-up? Basically, no. If they had had the live screening of tweets it could have made a big difference - with people interacting on and offline but in the same physical space. I'm sure that if I had a mobile access to the tweets it would have been different too - and would have contributed to and read what other tweeples were doing.

Many of those there are also bloggers, but not all. I reckon that many people who find blogging too much work, will enjoy tweeting a lot more. There would also be less of this kind of post happening after a tweetup (i.e. what happened, photos, etc). For a tweetup it's a lot more spontaneous and co-synchronous (happening at the same time). And once the event is over, there may be a 'thanks it was cool #twesitivalkl' tweet, and tweeple move onto whatever is happening in their life and tweetzone at that time.

[did a few edits - forgot to include a photo intially, some typos]

The virtue of practice

In Moral Philosophy there are four main strands:

• Utilitarianism: i.e. 'the greatest good for the greatest number'
• Egoism: i.e. 'I know what's best for me, and that's all that matters'
• Kantianism: i.e. 'there are certain things that are right, and that's that'
and
• Virtue ethics: i.e. 'learn to live the right life, and you will be good'

From what I have learnt of ethics, I find virtue ethics to be the most satisfying. It is inclusive, allowing one to pick and choose from the other three methods of determining morality, and it is practical - emphasising the difficulty of living morally, the ability to improve oneself and to learn from mistakes.

In the 'Western' tradition, Aristotle (a great man in most ways, though unfortunately also the root of much of EuroChristian sexist dogma) introduced this ethical method via his famous 'Golden Mean' (see e.g. MacKinnon 90). For example, you are walking down the street and you see a starving beggar: you would be miserly ('illiberal') not to spare a bit of the excess money you have, but stupid ('prodigal') to immediately sign over your bank account and house to him. What would be the virtuous thing to do would be to give him what you can spare.

In other words, adopt the 'Middle Path': which brings us to Buddhism and Confucianism. These religions/philosophies emphasise the ability of the individual to choose to act morally, and the need to learn to do so through actions.

From what I understand of Buddhism, it basically advises people to understand that suffering (a consequence of immoral action one might say) comes from desire, and one can avoid this by learning to reject the impulses that come from desire. This can be done through a slow process of meditation and practice (e.g. physically getting rid of all possessions to avoid getting attached to them).

Confucianism focuses less on the individual I would say, but again there is a strong emphasis on practice: with a famous passage stating (basically) that in order for a ruler to enable a virtuous kingdom, he (for women weren't involved here either...) has to start by practicing virtue himself (“The Great Learning” qtd. in Velasquez 161).

And a note on gender: Gilligan's famous approach argued that women tend to have a different way of making moral judgements. Key words are 'concrete', 'relational': i.e. placing moral dilemmas in their practical environment and judging from there (Rachels 163-4). Which, perhaps incidentally, ties in with the feminist insight of making the personal political.

In anthropology the importance of understanding human behaviour as 'practice', promoted by Bourdieu and others has come to dominate; and the fundamental method of anthropology - participant observation - seems to be gaining converts in all kinds of disciplines and areas (cultural studies, market research, ...). As a method, it promotes understanding through living - i.e. practice. A parallel necessary understanding is that researchers need to understand how they too affect the ongoing practices of what they are seeking to understand: known as being 'reflexive'.

So, to conclude this somewhat rambling post: morality is developed through practice, and honest reflection upon one's own position. Practice, as a method and as a theoretical standpoint, is emerging as a paradigm in many disciplines. Reflexivity is also central to ethnographic practice.

Therefore, I suppose, one can argue that social science methodologies have mostly shed the idealistic modern/scientific notion that neutrality and objectivity are attainable, and instead moving to an ethical stance that has its roots in virtue ethics.

++++++++++

Bourdieu, Pierre. The Field of Cultural Production. Essays on Art and Literature. Ed. Randal Johnson. UK: Polity Press, 1993.
MacKinnon, Barbara. Ethics. Theory and Contemporary Issues. 3rd ed. Belmont: Wadsworth, 2001.
Rachels, James. The Elements of Moral Philosophy. 4th ed. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2002.
Velasquez, Manuel. Philosophy. A Text with Readings. 9th ed. Belmont, CA: Wadsworth 2005.

Alpha Project bloggers

Doing an interview recently, I realised that I am the epitome of the bad blogger! My crime? I am inconsistent - I blog in spurts, but not regularly. A good blogger needs to blog regularly (at least 3 times a week), or at least consistently (e.g. every Sunday), so that the readers know what to expect and don't waste their time. I suppose that with Google Reader or RSS one can get around that, but still...

Anyway, I will make an effort to be more consistent from now on (but I've said that before, haven't I?)

Anyway - a few things have happened since my last post: a couple of screenings ('District 9' - great!, 'Murderer' - pretty lame), a birthday party, I bought a new super chair, and continued to be stressed out by work :-|

Yesterday, there was the launch of 'Project Alpha' (recognise the design?)
Project Alpha launch

It was combined with an Adidas promotion at the Centre Court in Megamall - you could get a "Mystery prize" by saying the password. It's "Drymax", but don't all go rushing to use it. Unless you really want a sample of "Tropical Passion - Adidas fragrance for women" which is all I got, or even a keychain (Tian Chad got both). I was so not impressed...
Tian Chad with Adidas gift

On the other hand, if you go there and buy Adidas shower gels and stuff like that to a value of RM45 or more (I think), you can win extra prizes (a bag, fragrance,...).

I also met Casey Liew, and Dustyhawk was also there, and helped me to choose a microphone afterwards, for my interviews.

After the trailer for Project Alpha was shown, there was a foosball competition. The KennySia and Jojo Struys team beat Nicolekiss and (er sorry I'm not sure...) beautifulnara (thanks Casey!)
KennySia Jojo Struys and Nicolekiss playing foosball

and, in spite of looking very focused,
sixthseal and fourfeetnine playing foosball

Sixthseal and Fourfeetnine lost to Redmummy and Budiey
Redmummy and Budiey playing foosball

The final was won by the Kenny and Jojo team,
Kenny Sia, Jojo Struys and Adidas person

and everyone got something anyway :-) Ahh the life of a blogebrity, freebies galore...
Bloggers at Project Alpha launch with Adidas

OK OK I know they work hard for it. By for example posting (and posing) regularly!

So that was that - I must say I'm intrigued by Project Alpha though - it's going to be an "Online TV Show" - kind of like the Malaysian Dreamgirl I suppose, but focusing on the life of bloggers.

When I think of it, calling it an "Online TV Show" is an interesting mix of terms - by definition, if it's online it's not television: in media studies terms I suppose what it means it is a television genre of programming, but it's distributed online.

It will feature one blogger every week, with a three minute segment every day. So it's like TV in that it is moving pictures with sound, broadcast at a certain time; but unlike TV because one can view it at any time, and it's short. Having it short suits online media - you can watch it in the time it takes to read a blogpost, and it's not going to take forever to download or cost too much if you're using a mobile device.

I must say, Malaysian blogging is always throwing up surprises. This is something of a glimpse into the future of new media I'd say. However, at this point the production of such a programme is taken over by professionals: my guess is that the next generation produsers, will be producing their own short videos. Sure you already have vlogs, but what I mean is that at some point, someone will be putting together an edited clip which would cover similar topics that blog posts do, in a way that is more than someone talking to a web cam.