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War blogs and blog wars

I saw this cartoon in The Star last week – interesting to see blogs mentioned in the funnies.

Also, with regards to the history of blogs, it’s revealing that the person brings up the invasion of Iraq. I was just reading an interesting PhD thesis by Geert Lovink where he argues that one of the means by which blogs became more known was through ‘war blogs’ that debated the response to 9/11. He quoted an article by David Gallagher in The New York Times which I had a look at too:
“The war-blogging movement took off after Sept. 11 as people used blogs to vent their anger about the terrorist attacks. Though they are still commonly known as war blogs, these sites now address a wide range of news and political topics, usually from right of center…
As a result, some latecomers now think Weblogs are inherently political. That has perturbed some Weblog veterans, who say the war bloggers are rewriting history and presenting a distorted view of blogs. They say the diversity of Weblogs is being overshadowed by the attention-getting style of war blogs…
‘The Weblog world before Sept. 11 was mostly inward-looking -- mostly tech people talking about tech things,’ said Glenn Reynolds, a law professor at the University of Tennessee who publishes InstaPundit.com, a popular site in the war blog camp that attracts about 19,000 readers on weekdays. ‘After 9/11 we got a whole generation of Weblogs that were outward-looking’ and written for a general audience, he said.” (Gallagher)

It also goes on to note that there was some bitching going on between the ‘old guard’ and the war bloggers.

In Malaysia also, most people associate blogs with politics – probably also because of the MSM, because they only pick up stories of blogs (mostly) when blogs start to compete with them in terms of forming public opinion. Which may also explain why The Star (I think) had an article about food blogs, as people can easily turn to blogs for recommendations of restaurants and it is also a traditional newspaper domain.


Works Cited.
Gallagher, David F. “A Rift among Bloggers.” The New York Times. 10 June 2002. 30 Jan 2008 http://www.nytimes.com/2002/06/10/technology/10BLOG.html.
Lovink, Geert Willem. “Dynamics of Critical Internet Culture (1994-2001).” University of Melbourne, 2002. 22 Dec 2007 http://eprints.infodiv.unimelb.edu.au/archive/00000768/01/phd.pdf .