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Advertorials and the blogger

OK, must blog every day right? A quick one before supper, dog walk, and bed. Hmm... will pour myself a little nip of whiskey first though :-) Reward at the end of the day :-)

I finally selected the ten blogs I want to focus on. It was difficult as there are so many interesting blogs out there, and all with useful aspects: in the end, my decision is based pretty much on popularity (i.e. the blogs with the highest visitors) and relevance to Nuffnang. It feels bad to let go of some others though.

I mean, one question is - is it a good idea just to look at the most popular ones? Aren't the less popular just as important, or maybe even more so, in revealing everyday practices of bloggers? Just like if I want to know more about Malaysians, I wouldn't just look at the lives of the rich and famous right? Argh, now I'm wondering all over again... My real problem is time - i.e. I can't track everyone, and I need to focus on those who do advertising, advertorials, etc.

I will also track (but less diligently) other blogs, and of course the comments in those I do track (the 'A-listers') will give insight into how bloggers/readers react.

On that note, here's something I was wondering about today:

When there is an advertorial, normally the blogger indicates that it is one - for example by putting a tag, or prefixing the post title. However, advertorials are usually written in the blogger's usual style, and typically they start like an ordinary post, but by the time you get to the end, it's quite clear it's an advertorial. On one post I read today, the blogger had forgotten to put the tag in and two commenters asked 'hey is this an advertorial or not?' - the blogger responded in the comments and put in the tag which s/he had forgotten. So, there was an example of readers wanting to know if the post was an advertorial or not.

This got me thinking a bit: do different readers of blogs respond differently to advertorials? I have seen readers criticising the blogger, praising the advertorial, asking about the product/service being profiled, and just ignoring the fact it's an advertorial.

It's my guess that - depending on the blog - the readers will respond differently. In Blog X - readers who are used to seeing the blogger try out different ways of doing an advertorial may comment on the quality of the advertorial; in Blog Y - which has lots and lots of comments, there are always some who disparage the blogger and use the advertorial to make accusations of selling out, etc; in Blog Z - the blogger makes more of an effort to discuss the product with the commenters.

I suppose, in a way a blog is a mini-microcosm of social interaction, coloured by and dominated by the blogger. Therefore the regular commenters will reflect that persona to a certain extent. So a blog will shape its readers in some manner, while they also shape the blog/blogger... The advertorial comes in as a specific genre that will get more or less reactions, depending on how the blogger presents it, and how much that diverges from the usual style/content of the blog. Which would also explain why an advertorial in a SoPo blog would be quite out of place; but one in - for example - an automotive blog - would hardly be noticed.

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